11/29/2020
Gourmet Cheese Guide

Gourmet Cheese Guide

Gourmet Cheese Guide

 

 

According to the International Federation of Dairy Producers, there are about five hundred types and combinations of cheeses in the world. There are classifications that number more than a thousand. We will tell you about what cheeses are and what classifications of cheeses are in this article.

 

Hardness.

 

Anyone knows that there are hard, soft, semi-soft cheeses, and others. At the same time, the classification of cheese by hardness is not the most accurate. It is far from always possible to unambiguously attribute cheese to some type – for example, in many cases the line between soft and semi-soft, hard and semi-hard cheeses is very blurred. The hardness of cheese depends on the liquid content, which in turn depends on the compression method and aging time.

 

• Soft cheeses are cheeses that do not require ripening such as Brie, Camembert and Neuchatel (all three are France).

• Curd cheeses are also mild in taste. These are Mozzarella, Mascarpone, Ricotta (all three are Italy), Feta (Greece).

• Semi-soft cheeses contain a lot of liquid, they are soft to the taste. This group includes Havarty cheese (Denmark), Munster and Port Salou (France).

• Cheese of medium hardness: Emmental and Gruyeres (Switzerland), Gouda and Edam (Holland), Jarlsberg (Norway), Cantal (France), Cascaval (Romania).

• Hard cheeses are prepared by pressing. Famous representatives of this type of cheese are Cheddar (English cheese from Somerset, England), Parmesan and Pecorino Romano (Italy).

• Some hard and semi-hard cheeses are cooked before pressing. Types of hard cheeses:

• Cooked pressed cheeses include Emmental and Gruyeres (Switzerland), Parmesan (Italy), Beaufort and Conte (France).

• Uncooked pressed cheeses – Gouda and Edamer (Holland), Cheddar (England), Cantal and Mimolet (France).

 

Maturing time

 

Depending on the type of cheese, the ripening time can last from several weeks to several years.

 

• Fresh cheeses are prepared relatively quickly and easily. These include cottage cheese, cream cheese Philadelphia, Indian paneer, soft cheese with greens fromage blanc, Mexican curd cheese queso fresco, Corsican cheese Brochchio, Italian Ricotta and Mozzarella, Greek Misitra, Cypriot Anari, Norwegian Brunost, and others.

• Cheeses that are aged for several weeks: Camembert (three weeks), Taleggio (6 to 10 weeks), Monterey Jack (about a month).

• Up to a year: Roquefort (5 months), Emmental (4 months).

• More than a year: Cheddar and Gouda (good grades – at least a year), Parmigiano Reggiano (at least a year), Manchego (up to 2 years).

 

By country of origin.

 

There are many types of cheeses from different countries, and yet some countries are among the leaders:

 

• Of course, this is France, which is home to more than 500 varieties of cheese, including such as Brie, Camembert, Conte, and many others.

• Italy, as the birthplace of pizza, is also among the leaders in the number of cheeses. This is the well-known Mozzarella, Parmesan, Provolone, etc.

• Switzerland: Emmental, Gruyeres. There are also famous cheeses in the UK (Cheddar), Germany (Bavaria Bleu, Kambotsola), Greece (Feta), Georgia (Suluguni), Spain (Manchego), Holland (Gouda, Edamer), Norway (Yarlsberg) , in Russia (Adygea). By source of milk Most cheeses are made from cow’s milk, but there are exceptions: cheeses from sheep’s milk (Roquefort, Aragon, Costellano, Ricotta, Feta), from goat’s milk (Pelardon, Rigott de Condrieux, Crotten de Chavignolles), and from milk of others animals (rare types of cheese).

 

The importance of raw materials in the production of cheese cannot be overestimated. For all cheeses of the highest quality, the best milk is always used. The cleanliness of milking and production equipment is at the level of scientific laboratories. Grazing animals is carried out on selected pastures with known herbs.

 

There are cheeses that can only be made from morning milk. And there are those where only milk obtained from grazing animals on green grass is used. The same version of cheese produced in the winter is considered less valuable. Thus, all Roquefort fans know that when sheep are kept in pastures from March to September, and the cheese ripens within three months, the best Roquefort is only from June to December.

 

Today, many well-known varieties of cheese have become generic, and their varieties can be produced thousands of kilometers from where they were born. At the same time, it is clear that the quality that brought fame to a particular variety can be guaranteed only by a combination of all the conditions described above, as well as a number of other factors – suitable climate, water, environmental cleanliness, etc.

 

Not to mention the secrets of production known only to the original manufacturers, passed down from generation to generation. In order not to be misled, every cheese lover should know the full classic name of his favorite. To protect himself from fakes, the cheese maker took care of the traditional variety, introducing special markings into the design, which he alone has the right to use. Of course, original cheeses are much more expensive than imitation, sometimes in many times.

 

 

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According to the International Federation of Dairy Producers, there are about five hundred types and combinations of cheeses in the world. There are classifications that number more than a thousand. We will tell you about what cheeses are and what classifications of cheeses are in this article.

 

Hardness.

 

Anyone knows that there are hard, soft, semi-soft cheeses, and others. At the same time, the classification of cheese by hardness is not the most accurate. It is far from always possible to unambiguously attribute cheese to some type – for example, in many cases the line between soft and semi-soft, hard and semi-hard cheeses is very blurred. The hardness of cheese depends on the liquid content, which in turn depends on the compression method and aging time.

 

• Soft cheeses are cheeses that do not require ripening such as Brie, Camembert and Neuchatel (all three are France).

• Curd cheeses are also mild in taste. These are Mozzarella, Mascarpone, Ricotta (all three are Italy), Feta (Greece).

• Semi-soft cheeses contain a lot of liquid, they are soft to the taste. This group includes Havarty cheese (Denmark), Munster and Port Salou (France).

• Cheese of medium hardness: Emmental and Gruyeres (Switzerland), Gouda and Edam (Holland), Jarlsberg (Norway), Cantal (France), Cascaval (Romania).

• Hard cheeses are prepared by pressing. Famous representatives of this type of cheese are Cheddar (English cheese from Somerset, England), Parmesan and Pecorino Romano (Italy).

• Some hard and semi-hard cheeses are cooked before pressing. Types of hard cheeses:

• Cooked pressed cheeses include Emmental and Gruyeres (Switzerland), Parmesan (Italy), Beaufort and Conte (France).

• Uncooked pressed cheeses – Gouda and Edamer (Holland), Cheddar (England), Cantal and Mimolet (France).

 

Maturing time

 

Depending on the type of cheese, the ripening time can last from several weeks to several years.

 

• Fresh cheeses are prepared relatively quickly and easily. These include cottage cheese, cream cheese Philadelphia, Indian paneer, soft cheese with greens fromage blanc, Mexican curd cheese queso fresco, Corsican cheese Brochchio, Italian Ricotta and Mozzarella, Greek Misitra, Cypriot Anari, Norwegian Brunost, and others.

 

• Cheeses that are aged for several weeks: Camembert (three weeks), Taleggio (6 to 10 weeks), Monterey Jack (about a month).

• Up to a year: Roquefort (5 months), Emmental (4 months).

• More than a year: Cheddar and Gouda (good grades – at least a year), Parmigiano Reggiano (at least a year), Manchego (up to 2 years).

 

By country of origin.

 

There are many types of cheeses from different countries, and yet some countries are among the leaders:

• Of course, this is France, which is home to more than 500 varieties of cheese, including such as Brie, Camembert, Conte, and many others.

• Italy, as the birthplace of pizza, is also among the leaders in the number of cheeses. This is the well-known Mozzarella, Parmesan, Provolone, etc.

• Switzerland: Emmental, Gruyeres. There are also famous cheeses in the UK (Cheddar), Germany (Bavaria Bleu, Kambotsola), Greece (Feta), Georgia (Suluguni), Spain (Manchego), Holland (Gouda, Edamer), Norway (Yarlsberg) , in Russia (Adygea). By source of milk Most cheeses are made from cow’s milk, but there are exceptions: cheeses from sheep’s milk (Roquefort, Aragon, Costellano, Ricotta, Feta), from goat’s milk (Pelardon, Rigott de Condrieux, Crotten de Chavignolles), and from milk of others animals (rare types of cheese).

 

The importance of raw materials in the production of cheese cannot be overestimated. For all cheeses of the highest quality, the best milk is always used. The cleanliness of milking and production equipment is at the level of scientific laboratories. Grazing animals is carried out on selected pastures with known herbs.

 

There are cheeses that can only be made from morning milk. And there are those where only milk obtained from grazing animals on green grass is used. The same version of cheese produced in the winter is considered less valuable. Thus, all Roquefort fans know that when sheep are kept in pastures from March to September, and the cheese ripens within three months, the best Roquefort is only from June to December.

 

Today, many well-known varieties of cheese have become generic, and their varieties can be produced thousands of kilometers from where they were born. At the same time, it is clear that the quality that brought fame to a particular variety can be guaranteed only by a combination of all the conditions described above, as well as a number of other factors – suitable climate, water, environmental cleanliness, etc.

 

Not to mention the secrets of production known only to the original manufacturers, passed down from generation to generation. In order not to be misled, every cheese lover should know the full classic name of his favorite. To protect himself from fakes, the cheese maker took care of the traditional variety, introducing special markings into the design, which he alone has the right to use. Of course, original cheeses are much more expensive than imitation, sometimes in many times.

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